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Spoken English

English : A Global Language

English is "the language of communication". Why? Because most of the people in the world have agreed to use English as their common language for conversation with each other.

It's an official language in over 50 countries around the world. The total number of people who can speak English, including those who speak it as a second language is well over a billion English is a relatively easy language to learn. With a little practice, you should soon find yourself able to get by in most everyday situations. It is currently the language most often taught as a foreign language.

English is no longer the exclusive cultural property of "native English speakers", but is rather a language that is absorbing aspects of cultures worldwide as it continues to grow. It is, by international treaty, the official language for aerial and maritime communications. English is an official language of the United Nations and many other international organizations.

Books, magazines, and newspapers written in English are available in many countries around the world, and English is the most commonly used language in the sciences with Science Citation Index reporting as early as 2002 that 95% of its articles were written in English, even though only half of them came from authors in English-speaking countries.

English has gained importance as an international language and plays an important part even in countries where the UK has historically had little influence. It is also an essential part of the curriculum in far-flung places like Japan and South Korea, and is increasingly seen as desirable by millions of speakers in China. British English remains the model in most commonwealth countries where English is learnt as a second language. However, as the history of English has shown, this situation may not last indefinitely. The increasing commercial and economic power of countries like India, for instance, might mean that Indian English will one day begin to have an impact beyond its own borders.